Category archives: Projects

Grape Soda

Grape Soda, 2017
Neon
243.8 x 92.1 x 10.2 cm
96 x 36 1/4 x 4 in
Edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s proofs

Art Basel Miami Beach
2017
Pilar Corrias Gallery
Installation View
……..
Grape Soda (2017), is a custom neon sculpture depicting the Tropical Fantasy soft drink avor often sold at bodegas in large cities. The Tropical Fantasy along with Orange Crush and Wild Cherry Berry soft drink avors all come into play across Self’s bodega inspired works. Grape Soda, references the neon signs seen on bodega shop fronts, while simultaneously functioning as part of the visual landscape of Black and Latino diasporic communities across New York City. The notion of a tropical fantasy works as a double entendre, as both a reference to the hyper-sexualisation of Black female bodies and the cultural positioning of Black men and women as wielding an exotic, unbridled sexual identity. The soda’s name is inherently racist and vague and it is marketed directly to people of colour, especially children, often in a predatory fashion. For the artist, the items throughout the bodega, their names and their consumption, mirror the ways in which the black body is othered and commodi ed by the culture at large. Consumers are coerced into purchasing these products, with the grape soda operating as an emblem of this cultural consumption. Grape Soda (2017) is a work from Tschabalala Self’s latest exhibition and body of work, Bodega Run.

Art Basel-Miami, 2017

KLK
8’ (H) x 7’ (W)
Acrylic, flashe, fabric and painted canvas on canvas
2017

Koco at the Bodega
8’ (H) x 7’ (W)
Colored pencil, photocopies of hand-colored drawings, acrylic, flashe, fabric and painted canvas on canvas
2017

Bars
8’ (H) x 7’ (W)
Colored pencil, gouache, photocopies of hand-colored drawings, acrylic, flashe, fabric and painted canvas on canvas
2017

Sparkle Tower
93” (H) x 24” (W)
Hand colored digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, colored pencil and watercolor
2017

Bleach Bottle Red
24”(H) x 17” (W)
Hand colored digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, colored pencil and watercolor
2017

Color safe
41.5”(H) x 41.5” (W)
Hand colored digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, colored pencil and watercolor
2017

Behind the Counter in Blue
33.5”(H) x 37” (W)
Hand colored digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, colored pencil and watercolor
2017

Art Basel Miami Beach
2017
Pilar Corrias Gallery
Installation View 

Art Basel Miami Beach
2017
Pilar Corrias Gallery
Installation View

Art Basel Miami Beach
2017
Pilar Corrias Gallery
Installation View

T Magazine

Princess

Princess
Fabric, acrylic, flashe, oil and human hair canvas
7′ (H) x 6′ (W)
2017

Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon

“Floor Dance,” “Mane,” and “Loner,” by Tschabalala Self, who stitches figures from patches of fabric on canvas. In the foreground is “Toxic,” an installation by Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz.
Credit Jake Naughton for The New York Times

“Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon” investigates gender’s place in contemporary art and culture at a moment of political upheaval and renewed culture wars. The exhibition features an intergenerational group of artists who explore gender beyond the binary to usher in more fluid and inclusive expressions of identity.

Installation view: Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon

Installation view: Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon

Installation view: Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon 

New Museum

New Museum – Audio Guide  

The New York Times 

Gayletter 

The New Yorker 

New York Magazine 

Bodega Run: London

Keeper 1
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017
……
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017

Keeper 1
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017
……
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Bodega Run: London

Morena Diptych 1
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
53 x 66 x 2 cm
2017

Boar’s Head Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolor
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

La Morena Bean Study 1
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
145 x 89 x 2 cm
2017

NyQuil and Phone Card Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Crush Soda Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Sparkle and Scott Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Ice, Presidente, Clorox, Pampers, Fabuloso, and Lotto Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
106 x 104.5 x 2 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Untitled (ATM)
Framed and mounted colour photographs shot on disposable camera
41 x 51.5 x 2 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017


 

Bodega Run: London

Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017
……..
Tschabalala Self, who identifies primarily as a painter while also working across various media, explores the implicit politicisation and sexualisation of Black bodies through a self-reflexive lens. Through the depiction of characters with active histories, psychologies and desires, her practice functions as a subversion of ethno-cultural stereotyping. With Bodega Run, Self expands her approach to create dynamic, rounded and multi-dimensional characters out of the items and experiences that exist within these corner stores. Bodegas emerged with the arrival and settlement of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in New York and have traditionally been owned and operated by various communities of colour. The Spanish word for shop, ‘bodega’, has become a colloquialism for the small, family run corner stores seen all over the city. Found primarily in Black and Latino neighborhoods and often occupying the main intersections of these areas, the bodega has become a geographic emblem of Manhattan’s diaspora. In Central Harlem, the area of New York City the artist was born and raised in, local bodegas are microcosms of cross-cultural exchange. With the demographic changes that have occurred across the city in recent years, bodega ownership has shifted from being Puerto Rican and Dominican to predominantly Yemeni, with these shops continuing to service primarily Black and Latino customers. Through their practice of Islam, these new Yemeni bodega owners have a unique relationship to the Black communities who have traditionally engaged and continue to participate in these businesses. With Islam being a religion often adopted across Black diaspora as a way of reconnecting with African heritage, bodegas have become spaces for creating intersectional and inclusive connections across various cultures. The bodega’s existence, like the Black, Latino and Yemeni communities that inhabit New York City, is rooted in exclusion and therefore, has become a space for marginalized communities to organise and create their own local exchange economies. Bodegas sell a wide selection and an often-multifarious array of products. As stores that are operated by people of colour to serve people of colour, catering to the communities they are located within, the bodega has become an articulation of its neighborhood’s identity. Self’s Bodega Run is an investigation of the social, political and economic implications of these corner stores through an exploration of the products they sell and their aesthetic organization. Self creates her own bodega inspired by the shops that are emblematic of her culture and upbringing. As her first foray into installation, Bodega Run, represents a new avenue for the artist, who has created wallpaper, neon readymades, animation, photographs and large scale sculptures all emblematic of bodega accoutrement. Additionally, the paintings and drawings included throughout the exhibition employ the household products and food items commonly seen and procured in bodegas, as their subjects.

Bodega Run Diptych – Panel 1
……..
Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017

Bodega Run Diptych – Panel 2
……..
Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017

Bayo,
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, crayon, coloured pencil, hand-coloured photocopy, coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′(H) x 7′(W)
243.8 x 213.3 cm
2017

Habibi Papi
Watercolour, acrylic, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, hand- coloured photocopies, photocopies hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W)
243.8 x 213.4 cm
2017

Fresh
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, coloured pencil, crayon, hand-coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas and faux jewel on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W)
243.8 x 213.3 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 1
Mirrored plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Milkcrate
Laser cut mdf
60.9 x 104 x 73.6 cm
2017

Metal Milk Crate
Mild steel
121.9 x 60.9 x 40.6 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

 

INSTALLATION VIEWS

Face to Face

Muva
Acrylic, flashe and fabric on canvas
44″ x 62″
2016

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017
curated by: Naima J. Keith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, CAAM, and Diana Nawi, Associate Curator, Pérez Art Museum Miami.
……..
The earliest work in this exhibition is Lyle Ashton Harris’s ironically titled black-and-white photograph, Miss America (1987–88), which depicts a woman sitting for a formal studio portrait wearing white face and draped in an American flag. The photograph establishes many of the key tenets that the artists on view here have continued to explore over the past thirty years, using the human figure to trenchantly address questions of identity, belonging, performance, and representation.

California African American Museum 

From DADA to TA-DA!

Tschabalala Self
Painting as Companion, 2017
Instant photography
11 x 18

Tschabalala Self
Painting as Companion, 2017
Instant photography
11 x 18
……..
Painting as Companion –
This instant-photography series explores the relationship between Man and work. A painting is a life-partner, a familiar and consistent impression. Painting as Companion, explores the concept of a never-made within an interpersonal dynamic; one is which a work of art is endowed with human affect and elevated to the most coveted quotidian object, a lover.

​100 years ago, Duchamp debuted his iconoclastic Readymade, Fountain, challenging the art world’s pious definition of high art, and effectively paving the way for conceptual art. Conversely, his idea of a “Reciprocal Readymade: Turn a Rembrandt into an ironing board”, was never realized and existed only as a theoretical concept.

But can art be recycled? Is contemporary art a first-world indulgence? Is anything really void of symbolism? In 2017, the urgency to draw a line in the sand between form and function seems less dire, but also more complicated. For this exhibition, a group of artists and thinkers have been challenged to determine if a Reciprocal Readymade or “Nevermade” can be realized, and explore what further complications this exercise could elicit. As we careen towards hyperreality, with artwork becoming more immaterial and artist’s embracing new technologies, will the difference between artwork and utility— like reality and simulation — become equally indistinguishable?

NEVERMADE: (neh’fer-maid) n. It: No Gracie fare! Fr. Jamais réalisé 1. To repurpose or recycle an existing artwork (object, concept, ornament, decoration) as a unique consumer product – one that performs a particular operative function or purpose, void of any symbolism, resisting interpretation, and abandoning any former inherent significance or greater meaning. 2. The act of extracting meaning and designating utility. 3. The result of revoking/ demoting/ upgrading/ cartwheeling the status of an existing artwork, and reincarnating in the form of an object/product/tool with use value. 4. A conceptual exercise in language and appropriation meant to explore the concept of art as commodity. 5. Converting SIGN into THING.

Synonym: Reciprocal Readymade
Antonym: Readymade – a functional, household item rendered useless in the context of an “artwork”.
Examples: 1. “This exhibition of Nevermades is literally full of one liners.” 2. “Thanks to my brand new Nevermade, never again will I have to tolerate that useless Cady Noland sculpture that just stares back at me disapprovingly.”
Curated by Max Wolf ​