Category archives: Projects

Bodega Run

Keeper 1
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017
……
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017

Keeper 1
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017
……
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Bodega Run

Morena Diptych 1
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
53 x 66 x 2 cm
2017

Boar’s Head Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolor
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

La Morena Bean Study 1
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
145 x 89 x 2 cm
2017

NyQuil and Phone Card Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Crush Soda Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Sparkle and Scott Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
43 x 58 x 2 cm
2017

Ice, Presidente, Clorox, Pampers, Fabuloso, and Lotto Study
Hand coloured digital archive print on German etching paper, crayon, coloured pencil, and watercolour
106 x 104.5 x 2 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Untitled (ATM)
Framed and mounted colour photographs shot on disposable camera
41 x 51.5 x 2 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017


 

Bodega Run

Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017
……..
Tschabalala Self, who identifies primarily as a painter while also working across various media, explores the implicit politicisation and sexualisation of Black bodies through a self-reflexive lens. Through the depiction of characters with active histories, psychologies and desires, her practice functions as a subversion of ethno-cultural stereotyping. With Bodega Run, Self expands her approach to create dynamic, rounded and multi-dimensional characters out of the items and experiences that exist within these corner stores. Bodegas emerged with the arrival and settlement of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in New York and have traditionally been owned and operated by various communities of colour. The Spanish word for shop, ‘bodega’, has become a colloquialism for the small, family run corner stores seen all over the city. Found primarily in Black and Latino neighborhoods and often occupying the main intersections of these areas, the bodega has become a geographic emblem of Manhattan’s diaspora. In Central Harlem, the area of New York City the artist was born and raised in, local bodegas are microcosms of cross-cultural exchange. With the demographic changes that have occurred across the city in recent years, bodega ownership has shifted from being Puerto Rican and Dominican to predominantly Yemeni, with these shops continuing to service primarily Black and Latino customers. Through their practice of Islam, these new Yemeni bodega owners have a unique relationship to the Black communities who have traditionally engaged and continue to participate in these businesses. With Islam being a religion often adopted across Black diaspora as a way of reconnecting with African heritage, bodegas have become spaces for creating intersectional and inclusive connections across various cultures. The bodega’s existence, like the Black, Latino and Yemeni communities that inhabit New York City, is rooted in exclusion and therefore, has become a space for marginalized communities to organise and create their own local exchange economies. Bodegas sell a wide selection and an often-multifarious array of products. As stores that are operated by people of colour to serve people of colour, catering to the communities they are located within, the bodega has become an articulation of its neighborhood’s identity. Self’s Bodega Run is an investigation of the social, political and economic implications of these corner stores through an exploration of the products they sell and their aesthetic organization. Self creates her own bodega inspired by the shops that are emblematic of her culture and upbringing. As her first foray into installation, Bodega Run, represents a new avenue for the artist, who has created wallpaper, neon readymades, animation, photographs and large scale sculptures all emblematic of bodega accoutrement. Additionally, the paintings and drawings included throughout the exhibition employ the household products and food items commonly seen and procured in bodegas, as their subjects.

Bodega Run Diptych – Panel 1
……..
Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017

Bodega Run Diptych – Panel 2
……..
Bodega Run Diptych
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, pencil, hand- coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W) each
243.8 x 213.4 cm (each)
2017

Bayo,
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, crayon, coloured pencil, hand-coloured photocopy, coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′(H) x 7′(W)
243.8 x 213.3 cm
2017

Habibi Papi
Watercolour, acrylic, flashe, gouache, coloured pencil, hand- coloured photocopies, photocopies hand-coloured canvas on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W)
243.8 x 213.4 cm
2017

Fresh
Acrylic, watercolour, flashe, coloured pencil, crayon, hand-coloured photocopy, hand-coloured canvas and faux jewel on canvas
8′ (H) x 7′ (W)
243.8 x 213.3 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 1
Mirrored plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 59.9 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Keeper 2
Mirrored Plexiglass
1.7 x 101.6 x 48.3 cm
2017
……..
Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

Milkcrate
Laser cut mdf
60.9 x 104 x 73.6 cm
2017

Metal Milk Crate
Mild steel
121.9 x 60.9 x 40.6 cm
2017

Installation view:
Tschabalala Self: Bodega Run
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
7 September – 27 September, 2017

 

INSTALLATION VIEWS

Face to Face

Muva
Acrylic, flashe and fabric on canvas
44″ x 62″
2016

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017

Face to Face: Los Angeles Collects Portraiture
July 12 – October 1, 2017
curated by: Naima J. Keith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, CAAM, and Diana Nawi, Associate Curator, Pérez Art Museum Miami.
……..
The earliest work in this exhibition is Lyle Ashton Harris’s ironically titled black-and-white photograph, Miss America (1987–88), which depicts a woman sitting for a formal studio portrait wearing white face and draped in an American flag. The photograph establishes many of the key tenets that the artists on view here have continued to explore over the past thirty years, using the human figure to trenchantly address questions of identity, belonging, performance, and representation.

From DADA to TA-DA!

Tschabalala Self
Painting as Companion, 2017
Instant photography
11 x 18

Tschabalala Self
Painting as Companion, 2017
Instant photography
11 x 18
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Painting as Companion –
This instant-photography series explores the relationship between Man and work. A painting is a life-partner, a familiar and consistent impression. Painting as Companion, explores the concept of a never-made within an interpersonal dynamic; one is which a work of art is endowed with human affect and elevated to the most coveted quotidian object, a lover.

​100 years ago, Duchamp debuted his iconoclastic Readymade, Fountain, challenging the art world’s pious definition of high art, and effectively paving the way for conceptual art. Conversely, his idea of a “Reciprocal Readymade: Turn a Rembrandt into an ironing board”, was never realized and existed only as a theoretical concept.

But can art be recycled? Is contemporary art a first-world indulgence? Is anything really void of symbolism? In 2017, the urgency to draw a line in the sand between form and function seems less dire, but also more complicated. For this exhibition, a group of artists and thinkers have been challenged to determine if a Reciprocal Readymade or “Nevermade” can be realized, and explore what further complications this exercise could elicit. As we careen towards hyperreality, with artwork becoming more immaterial and artist’s embracing new technologies, will the difference between artwork and utility— like reality and simulation — become equally indistinguishable?

NEVERMADE: (neh’fer-maid) n. It: No Gracie fare! Fr. Jamais réalisé 1. To repurpose or recycle an existing artwork (object, concept, ornament, decoration) as a unique consumer product – one that performs a particular operative function or purpose, void of any symbolism, resisting interpretation, and abandoning any former inherent significance or greater meaning. 2. The act of extracting meaning and designating utility. 3. The result of revoking/ demoting/ upgrading/ cartwheeling the status of an existing artwork, and reincarnating in the form of an object/product/tool with use value. 4. A conceptual exercise in language and appropriation meant to explore the concept of art as commodity. 5. Converting SIGN into THING.

Synonym: Reciprocal Readymade
Antonym: Readymade – a functional, household item rendered useless in the context of an “artwork”.
Examples: 1. “This exhibition of Nevermades is literally full of one liners.” 2. “Thanks to my brand new Nevermade, never again will I have to tolerate that useless Cady Noland sculpture that just stares back at me disapprovingly.”
Curated by Max Wolf ​

 

The Museum of Sex

NSFW: Female Gaze
Museum of Sex
New York, New York
21 June 2017 – 15 April 2018
……..
NSFW: Female Gaze, co-curated by VICE Media’s Creators, showcases over 25 emerging female artists from various disciplines dedicated to powerful feminine narratives. Every day, women are faced with a world of images that reflect male perspectives on sexual desire. The artists in NSFW Female Gaze both reclaim and break out of women’s historical roles as muse and object. The exhibition showcases a fearless new visual language of desire that defies social norms and expectations.
The artists featured in the exhibition are working at the intersections of identity and life experience, genre and process. They are exploring sexuality on their own terms, bringing to light new angles of expression. From Instagram and GIF platforms to textile, painting and photography, these artists take a diverse and fearless approach to sex, shattering mythologies of female sexuality and restructuring stereotypes to explore a more complex relationship between gender, pleasure, fantasy and desire.
Curated by Lissa Rivera & Marina Garcia Vasquez

NSFW: Female Gaze
Museum of Sex
New York, New York
21 June 2017 – 15 April 2018

My Black Ass with Red Cheeks
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

​My Black Ass with Magical Yoni
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

My Black Ass with Pink Box
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

My Black Ass with Black Cock
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

My Black Ass with Purple Pussy
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

​My Black Ass with Multicolored Wig
Gouache and color pencil on photocopy of pencil drawing
8.5″ (H) x 11″ (W)
2016

Artnet 

The Museum of Sex 

Art Basel-Basel, 2017

Lit
Fabric, acrylic, flashe and oil on canvas
84″ (H) x 60″ (W)
2017

Pilar Corrias Gallery Booth
……..
Art Basel-Basel, 2017

Tramway

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
Glasgow, UK
3 June – 20 August 2017
……..
Tramway presents a solo exhibition by American artist Tschabalala Self which draws together works from the first five years of her artistic career. Primarily concerned with the concept of the black female body within contemporary culture, Self examines the confluence of race, gender and sexuality through a variety of forms and narratives in which each subject – or as she prefers, character – expresses an individually powerful identity.
In her bold, confident and vibrant paintings and works on paper, Self plays inventively with figuration, deconstructing and recreating the body, using various techniques, including collage. Pieces of collected fabric – sometimes African or African-inspired cloth given to her by her mother – and paper or perhaps sections of an earlier unresolved work, are sewn directly onto a work. Working in this way with mixed-media allows Self to blend fact with fiction, reality with imagination as she explores how the Black female body functions as a social and political symbol.
The Tschabalala Self exhibition was organised by Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, London and has travelled to the Tramway in Glasgow.

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

Tschabalala Self
Tramway
3 June – 20 August 2017

The Scotsman

The Skinny 

This is Tomorrow 

Tramway

Frieze New York 2017

Boca
Fabric, flashe, oil and acrylic on canvas
68″ (H) X 50″ (w)
2017

Pressed
Fabric, flashe, gouache,oil and acrylic on canvas
68″ (H) X 50″ (w)
2017

Sugarfoot
Fabric, gouache, and acrylic on canvas
68″ (H) X 50″ (w)
2017

Frieze New York 2017 featured in the Focus section w/ T293 Gallery of Rome.

HIs & Hers
Gouache and acrylic on wood
8′ tall
2017
unique sculpture (cutout)

Glory (red,brown,black and green)
8′ tall
Gouache and acrylic on wood
unique sculpture (cutout)
2017

Frieze New York 2017
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Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Frieze New York 2017
——–
Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Frieze New York 2017
——–
Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Frieze New York 2017
——–
Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Frieze New York 2017
——–
Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Frieze New York 2017
——–
Focus w/ T293 Gallery

Culture Type

Body Language

 

Flowergirl
Gouache, color pencil, xerox, paper, faux flower, oil, acrylic and flashe on canvas
68″ (h) x 50″(w)
2017
Glory (violet, red and yellow)
88″ (h) x 47″ (w) x 1″ (d)
wood, gouache and acrylic
unique sculpture (cutout)
2017

NIV ACOSTA, JIMMY DESANA, JACOLBY SATTERWHITE, PATRICIA SATTERWHITE, TSCHABALALA SELF
——–
Body Language
April 20 – May 21

NIV ACOSTA, JIMMY DESANA, JACOLBY SATTERWHITE, PATRICIA SATTERWHITE, TSCHABALALA SELF
——–
Body Language
April 20 – May 21
Company Gallery – New York, NY
Curated by Andrew Durbin

Flowergirl
Gouache, color pencil, xerox, paper, faux flower, oil, acrylic and flashe on canvas
68″ (h) x 50″(w)
2017

Artforum

INSTALLATION VIEWS